Above waterline boat painting

1 post / 0 new
stanbulgaria
stanbulgaria's picture
Above waterline boat painting

This topic is to help do-it-yourself enthusiasts how to and with what to paint the above waterline surfaces. This is only an idea rather than a procedure, but it would do the job.

So you've noticed scratches or other damages on the paint. Depending of the damage comes the needed repair procedure. In steps it would look like that:

1. Clean well the grease, salt and other dirt that may be build over the paint. Use fresh water and appropriate soap or cleaner (a de-greaser could be an option).

2. Grind the old paint depending on its condition. With minor defects it would not be necessary to remove all the paint, but only to create a good bonding surface.

3. Clean with appropriate cleaner all the dust - this could be thinner or diluted acetone.

4. Use epoxy resin to repair the bigger defects.

5. Grind the surface roughly to get close to the original lines.

6. Clean with appropriate cleaner all the dust - this could be thinner or diluted acetone.

7. Now apply the first coat of the epoxy primer.

8. If you see minor defects use epoxy filler for repair.

9. Grind the surface light to medium with sand paper 120, 180 or 240.

10. Clean with appropriate cleaner all the dust - this could be thinner or diluted acetone.

11. Apply the second coat of the epoxy primer.

12. Light grind with sand paper 240, 320.

13. Clean with appropriate cleaner all the dust - this could be thinner or diluted acetone.

14. Apply top/finish coat - it would be best to apply two-component polyurethane paint in two coats. If you overcoat shortly after the fist coat, it might not be necessary to light grind between coats. Another option is one part enamel.

15. If high gloss paint is used it may not be needed to polish the final coat. Polish only if visible defects are present.

 

What materials to use:

1. To remove the dirt there are special products, but even a kitchen de-greaser - not abrasive, can be a solution, like Meglio.

2. Sand paper 120 is OK for relatively good surface.

3. Xylene or acetone.

4. For bigger repairs West epoxy products are aa good choice.

5. Sand paper 120 or 160.

6. Xylene or acetone.

7. A very good solution is Hempel Light Primer; Interprime 880 International by Akzo Nobel; Epifanes Epoxy Primer. Take also the recommended thinners - Hempel Thinner 845; International Thinner 910; Epifanes Epoxy Thinner.

8. West system 105+205/206+409

9. Sand paper for droplets 120 otherwise 180 or 240.

10. Xylene or acetone.

11. Second coat of Hempel Light Primer; Interprime 880 International by Akzo Nobel; Epifanes Poly-urethane Primer. Take also the recommended thinners - Hempel Thinner 845; International Thinner 910; Epifanes Poly-urethane slow brush Thinner.

12. Sand paper 240 or 320.

13. Xylene or acetone.

14. Hempel Polygloss 55530 with Hempel Thinner 871; International Perfection Undercoat with International Thinner 910; Epifanes Poly-urethane Topcoat with Epifanes Poly-urethane slow brush Thinner.

15. Second coat of Hempel Polygloss 55530 with Hempel Thinner 871; International Perfection Pro Classic Brush/Roller with International Thinner 910; Epifanes Poly-urethane Topcoat with Epifanes Poly-urethane slow brush Thinner.

 

Remember that you don't do that every year so initial high budget can be lower with the longer duration of the correct work.